Partanna Premium Select Whole Sicilian Black Olives

My kid loves to eat olives, I don’t know why, but I am not complaining. Apparently Sicilian Black Olives have fewer calories than other olives, and this is something that intrigues me, especially with the amount of olives that my kid eats.


The Sicilian olive is a type of olive which is used in the Sicilian cuisine and regional dishes of Italy. The Sicilian olives have a salty taste and a medium size and they are actually fruits, like all the olive species. The Sicilian olives are black and oval and contain fewer calories than the black oily ones.


Specifically, Partanna Premium Select Whole Sicilian Black Olives represent tradition and four generations of olive cultivation. Partanna is an old town in Italy located on a hill, and the olive growing takes place while nestled at the foot of that hill.


It is there in the heart of the Valle del Belice, which is known for its oil production, and exclusive cultivation around the Mediterranean basin, four generations of the family Asaro is committed with passion and dedication to create a natural product and dedicated to the high standards of quality that meets the needs of consumers, as evidenced by the numerous awards received for their products.


Table olive varieties are more difficult to harvest than olive oil, as workers must take care not to damage the fruit; baskets that hang around the worker's neck are used. In some places in Italy, Croatia and Greece, olives are harvested by hand because the terrain is too mountainous for machines. As a result, the fruit is not bruised, which leads to a superior finished product. The method also involves sawing off branches, which is healthy for future production.


Partanna Premium Select Whole Sicilian Black Olives make a great snack and are a great addition to salads or sandwiches. Of course, as with all olives, refrigerate after opening.

0 Comments | Posted in Salumeria By Mike Vlachos

Partanna Premium Select Black Saracene Olives

March 13, 2014 4:07:11 PM EDT

Partanna Premium Select Pitted Black Saracene Olives

Tucked away in northern Sicily in the area of Valdemone There you can find carefully tended orchids full of sarcene olive trees from which come Partanna Premium Select Black Saracene Olives. Perhaps not as well-known as some other types of olives such as the kalamata olive, the sarcene olive is considered to be one of the oldest types of olives grown today. The trees are well adapted to survive despite the rough terrain. The olives themselves tend to be smaller than the average olive and can be on difficult side to pick however, all that hard work involved in harvesting these olives is worth it when you get a flavorful product like Partanna Premium Select Black Saracene Olives.

So why olives? Well I certainly can’t speak for everyone, but sometimes a person just needs a salty snack. And as salty snacks go, olives are better for you than a lot of other stuff that we tend to choose such as potato chips or pretzels. And there are a number of other health benefits to eating olives. Olives have been proven to be a good source of dietary fiber which helps in lowering both cholesterol and sugar in the blood, as well as playing a part in helping to both obtain and maintain a healthy weight. Olives are also a good source of iron – used in making the hemoglobin needed by red blood – and vitamin E – which has shown to act as both an antioxidant and an immune booster – as well as being a good source of monosaturated fats which unlike polysaturated fats, actually help to lower your level of bad cholesterol and the risk for both heart disease and stroke rather than raise it. Plus I find that eating olives actually encourages me to drink more water which is something my doctor recommends I do.

As olives go, I find that I like Partanna Premium Select Black Saracene Olives. For me, they pack quite a punch for their size which is often exactly what I’m looking for in an olive. Of course, everyone has different tastes so I can’t say for certain that this olive is for everyone.

0 Comments | Posted in Salumeria By Mike Vlachos
Boschetto Al Tartufo Bianchetto

With so many choices to pick from, especially with Extra Virgin Olive Oil, shoppers usually just go with items that they know, but this is a mistake and their cooking suffers from it.


When looking for olive oil go with Castiglion Del Bosco Tuscan Extra Virgin Olive Oil for an oil with a golden in color with shades of emerald, has a fresh olive taste, with hints of cardoon and artichoke,  very broad and balanced with a pleasant bitter and spicy aftertaste making it particularly delightful. This oil is imported from Italy and is produced using cold extraction of olives.


An important issue often not realized by consumers is that the freshness of the olive oil makes a big difference. A very fresh oil, as available in an oil producing region, tastes noticeably different from the older oils available elsewhere. In time, oils deteriorate and become stale. One-year old oil may be still pleasant to the taste, but it is surely less fragrant than fresh oil. For optimal freshness, when storing extra virgin olive oil be sure to keep it away from heat and light.


Most people use olive oil in their cooking, but many cultures, dating back to ancient Greece, also use olive oil as a home remedy for skin care. The Japanese in particular use a lot of olive oil due to their belief that both the ingestion and topical application of olive oil is good for the skin and overall health.


The Castiglion Del Bosco Tuscan Extra Virgin Olive Oil is perfect for enhancing the flavor of any dish you choose, but is especially ideal for dressing fresh vegetables, drizzled over bruschetta or to use when tossing a pasta dish.


So for whatever cooking needs you have or if you choose to use extra virgin olive oil for health reasons, always make sure to use Castiglion Del Bosco Tuscan Extra Virgin Olive Oil to give your cooking a good kick in the pants.

0 Comments | Posted in Olive Oils and Balsamic Vinegar By Mike Vlachos

Capezzana - A Noble Oil From a Noble Family

August 5, 2013 10:00:48 AM EDT

>Capezzana Conte Contini Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Harvest 2012

Now you have the opportunity to get the freshest batch of Capezzana Conte Contini Bonacossi Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Harvest 2012 imported from Italy newly pressed in October of 2012. An important issue often not realized by consumers is that the freshness of the olive oil makes a big difference. A very fresh oil, as available in an oil producing region, tastes noticeably different from the older oils available elsewhere. In time, oils deteriorate and become stale. One-year old oil may be still pleasant to the taste, but it is surely less fragrant than fresh oil.

On the hills above the vineyards of Carmignano is a classic medieval estate that has produced olive oil for centuries. At Capezzana, olives are harvested at the perfect stage of ripeness, and are immediately crushed in a modern stone mill within 24 hours of harvest. The mill is technically innovative in that it draws the oil out of the olives by using a soft centrifugation that avoids a second centrifugation. This improved processing is that contributes to give an oil rich in aromas and flavors typical of the area of Carmignano. It is this improved processing that also produces an oil remarkably low in oleic acid, which serves to enhance the flavor and transparency. In a large stainless steel drum the oil is gently separated from water and solids using low temperatures and speeds producing the exclusive extra virgin Contini Bonacossi Olive Oil that they are so famous for.

Most people use olive oil in their cooking, but many cultures, dating back to ancient Greece, also use olive oil as a home remedy for skin care. The Japanese in particular uses a lot of olive oil due to their belief that both the ingestion and topical application of olive oil is good for the skin and overall health. Capezzana Conte Contini Bonacossi Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Harvest 2012 is perfect for enhancing the flavor of any dish you choose, but is especially ideal for dressing fresh vegetables or to use when tossing a pasta dish.

0 Comments | Posted in Olive Oils and Balsamic Vinegar By Mike Vlachos

Castello di Ama - A One of a Kind Olive Oil

June 18, 2013 2:04:53 PM EDT

Planeta Extra Virgin Olive Oil
When selecting olive oil, a lot of shoppers are misguided in their decisions and wrongly assume that all olive oils have been created equal when in truth, two bottles of olive oil can be vastly different from one another. The next time you're faced with an olive oil conundrum, choose Castello Di Ama Chianti Classico Tuscan Extra Virgin Olive Oil; problem solved.

Before opening up your bottle of Castello Di Ama olive oil, take a moment to reflect upon the nature of the contents of that bottle and to appreciate the exquisite quality of olive oil that you have before you. Castello Di Ama olive oil is made in limited quantities because the trees yield only about one liter per tree; they only produced 225 cases of oil this year. Between the end of October and the end of November all of the olives are harvested by hand and are pressed within hours of being picked, and what you are privy to receive in a bottle is the result of this delicate process.

Opening up a bottle of Castello Di Ama olive oil takes you back to that harvesting process, allowing you to smell a strong aroma as if an actual olive tree was planted before you. Hints of thistle, artichoke and wild chicory, with intense fragrant hints of rosemary and mint amaze your senses, and its taste elicits that of fresh vegetables, lettuce, black pepper and almond. With such an obvious aroma and memorable taste, Castello Di Ama olive oil will lead you to wonder how you managed to get by with just an ordinary olive oil until now. Using Castello Di Ama olive oil will elevate your recipes, endowing them with a renewed sense of intense flavor that an ordinary olive oil could never give them, so go ahead and drizzle some on top of your fresh salmon or use it to sauté vegetables. You'll be delighted with the results.
0 Comments | Posted in Olive Oils and Balsamic Vinegar By Mike Vlachos